Ancient Greek statue resembles a laptop

Ancient Greek statue resembles a laptop

There’s a new conspiracy theory questioning whether a laptop or hand held digital device was carved into an ancient Greek statue. The statue dating back to 100bc shows a woman holding a laptop offering it to a well-dressed female sitting on what looks like a throne. 
 
YouTube user known by the alias “StillPeakingOut” introduced the theory proposing that the ancient Oracle of Delphi may have forecasted the creation of laptops. 
 
"Just so we are clear, I'm not saying that this relief was depicting an ancient laptop computer," StillSpeakingOut said in the 100-second-long video. 
But "Greek tales about the Oracle of Delphi, which was supposed to allow the priests to quote-unquote connect with the gods and retrieve advanced information of various aspects," made him wonder whether the statue represented a prediction, says StillSpeakingOut.
 
The statue is owned by the Paul Getty Museum, Malibu, California, and senior curator of antiquities Jerry Spier says “In fact, the object depicted on the statue does look something like a laptop”
 
But, of course, it's not, he added. 
 
"The 'USB ports' are drill holes for the attachment of a bronze object, or perhaps a separate piece of marble," says Professor Jeff Hurwit of the art history and classics faculty at the University of Oregon. 
 
According to the J. Paul Getty Museum, the statue, officially called "Grave Naiskos of an Enthroned Woman with an Attendant," depicts a well-dressed woman lounging on a cushioned armchair and reaching out "to touch the lid of a shallow chest held by a servant girl,"
 
Spier told Live Science that funerary reliefs, fashioned out of marble like this one, were common in ancient Greece, going in and out of style over the years, dating back to the 1st and to the 6th century BC.  
 
He added: These funerary statues would have sat above graves of the deceased, and are called Naiskos, which are small temples dedicated to the deceased. This one would have likely had a triangular top, and probably had the departed woman's name painted on top,
 
"Seriously? “The 'laptop' is in fact a shallow box or lidded tray from which the woman is about to select a piece of jewellery, as is commonly shown in grave reliefs like this one." said Professor Hurwit 
 
Guests visiting the J. Paul Getty Museum can decide for themselves what the statue is actually depicting on the 18th April 2016 for the exhibit called, "Pergamon and the Hellenistic Kingdoms of the Ancient World."