April Fools' Day 2016

April Fools' Day 2016

A huge number of individuals in homes, schools and working environments spend the morning of April 1 playing common sense jokes on each other in the trust of a snappy chuckle (and to abstain from doing work). 
 
The media adoration to play the joker and numerous publications around the world, enjoy the annual opportunity to distribute a fake news story to end up their readers.
 
‘Victims’ of April Fools’ pranks are known as April Fools, but only until 12:00. There after the person playing the joke is considered the April Fool.
Unfortunately, the day, which has been popular throughout the Western world since the 19th century, is not a public holiday.
 
In 1957, the BBC broadcast a film on Panorama showing Swiss farmers pricking freshly grown spaghetti, calling it the Swiss Spaghetti Harvest. The broadcaster was flooded with requests about the plant.
 
Since 1986 press releases for the New York City April Fools' Day Parade - which doesn't exist - have been issued every year.
 
In 1998 Burger King reeled in customers with a full-page advert in USA Today for its 'left-handed Whopper' - with all the condiments rotated 180 degrees especially for left-handed diners. The fast-food chain later announced 'Everyone knows that it takes two hands to hold a Whopper!'.
 
In 2008 the BBC caught viewers out by running a video clip of flying penguins, claiming the birds were flying to tropical rainforests in South American to escape the harsh Antarctic weather.
 
Ikea made a fool out of its furniture fans by producing and releasing a high chair for dogs in 2011.
 
Where did the day originate? The origins of the day are undefined.
Many people assume the day stems from Pope Gregory XIII. In 1582, he wanted his new Gregorian calendar to replace the old Julian calendar.
 
This called for New Year’s Day to be celebrated on January 1st instead of the end of March.
 
But some seemingly didn't get the memo and continued to celebrate New Year’s Day on April. 
 
These poor folk were made fun of and were sent on ‘fool’s errands’ for a laugh.
However, others think April Fools' Day stems from the age when people used to hold spring festivals marking the end of winter with 'mayhem and misrule', according to the Museum of Hoaxes.
 
The Ancient Roman festival of Hilaria celebrated the renaissance of the god Attis and involved dressing in disguise.
 
Many other cultures have held renewal festivals in Europe around April 1 and there are references to these dating back to the 1500s.
 
What is clear though is that by the 1700s, the day of hilarity was well entrenched in Britain, and now April 1st is officially the most amusing day of the year.