Blind Spots can be shrunk in the Human Eye

Blind Spots can be shrunk in the Human Eye

A new study conducted on 10 people by a group of researchers has shown that it is possible to shrink the size of the blind spot on a human eye.
 
They have discovered that the size of the blind spot can be shrunk through a process of various eye exercises thus improving the vision in a human eye. The blind spot of a human eye is the region in a person’s visual field that aligns with the area of the eye that has no receptors for light. Therefor the human eye cannot detect any images.
 
The research has shown that through exercise this area of the eye can be reduced by at least 10 percent.
 
That amount of change “is quite an improvement, but people wouldn’t notice, as we are typically unaware of our blind spots,” said study author Paul Miller. Normally, the brain pulls in visual information from the regions surrounding the blind spot, compensating for it, so people don’t usually perceive it.
 “The real significance is that our data shows that regions of blindness can be shrunk by training, and this may benefit people who suffer from pathological blindness,” Paul Miller.
 
When the study was conducted, the researchers trained 10 people for 20 days on what researchers call a “direction-discrimination” task. During the task, the investigators used an image of a ring, centred in the blind spot of one of the person’s eyes. Waves of dark and light bands moved through the ring, and the participants were asked what direction the waves were moving. 
 
Eventually, the people’s eyes were better able to detect the image in their blind spot. At the end of the study, the participants’ ability to correctly judge both the direction of the waves and the colour of the ring improved.