How Phone Hacking Worked and How to Make Sure You’re Not A Victim

How Phone Hacking Worked and How to Make Sure You’re Not A Victim

Not only can your mobile device be hacked, it can be done fairly easily without you even knowing it happen.
 
"At the end of the day, everything is hackable. What I am surprised about is that people sometimes forget that it's so easy to hack into these devices," said Adi Sharabani, the co-founder of mobile security company Skycure, who used to work for Israeli Intelligence.
 
Even if a nasty invader cannot get into your mobile, they can try to get the sensitive data stored inside, as well as contacts, places visited & e-mails.
"It's important to realize that the services your smartphone relies on are much more attractive target to attackers. So for example, the photo leak that happened from iCloud where a bunch of celebrities had their photos posted all over the Internet is the perfect example," said Alex McGeorge, the head of threat intelligence at cybersecurity company Immunity, Inc.
 
Frequently, the hack occurs lacking the consumer's knowledge, according to Sharabani.
 
And it's not just customers that hackers target. With the rise of smartphones and tablets in the workplace, hackers attempt to attack companies through weaknesses in mobile devices.
 
Both Sharabani and McGeorge complete attack simulations for clients and find that these hacking demos typically go unobserved.
 
"It's usually very rare that a breach that originated through a mobile device or is just contained to a mobile device is likely to be detected by a corporation's incident response team," McGeorge said.
 
And Sharibani agrees. He says he's still waiting for somebody to contact him and say that their IT department acknowledged the attack demo.
"No one knows," he said. "And the fact that organizations do not know how many of their mobile devices encountered an attack in the last month is a problem."
 
But there is a silver lining, according to the wireless industry.
 
"The U.S. has one of the lowest malware infection rates in the world thanks to the entire wireless ecosystem working together and individually to vigilantly protect consumers," said John Marinho, vice president of technology and cybersecurity at CTIA, the wireless association. CTIA is an industry group that represents both phone carriers and manufacturers.