Mach 10 Hypersonic Commercial Airline, Concept or Near Future travel?

Mach 10 Hypersonic Commercial Airline, Concept or Near Future travel?

Skreemr, a hypersonic plane in concept, could get you from New York to London in only 30 minutes, going at 10 times the speed of sound, or just shy of 8,000 mph (12,348 km/h). This mean flying machine was designed by Canadian Engineer and inventor Charles Bombardier. 
 
The plane will be launched at extremely high speeds with the assistance of a magnetic rail gun launching system. Rockets would then surge the airplane speed enough to ignite its ultimate scramjet engine, making it conceivable to travel at speeds of up to Mach 10. 
 
Bombardier said the Skreemr concept aims to ignite people's imagination around the idea of hypersonic flight. "I added the idea of using a non-rocket space launch system and conventional rockets to accelerate the aircraft initially," Bombardier said. "I am aware that the challenge of defining such an aircraft is very complex, especially at lower altitude where the air is dense and heat accumulates rapidly on all surfaces."
 
The Skreemr would be launched from an electric launch system, as per Bombardier. The plane would then ignite the liquid oxygen and kerosene fuel rockets to ascend in height and achieve speeds of Mach 4 (or maintain the initial speeds of launch from the railgun system). The plane would then light up its scramjet engine and blaze hydrogen and compressed oxygen to accelerate exponentially. 
 
Scramjet engines are as of now being created in the U.S. furthermore, China, however it will probably be years before the novelty is applied on military drones. Be that as it may, maybe in the far off future, Bombardier said they could be used to fly passengers across oceans at very high speeds.
 
The Skreemr plane would be operated commercially to transport passengers effectively from continent to continent. It would be able to carry up to 75 passengers and travel 5 times faster than the Concorde, a now decommissioned commercial supersonic plane, as indicated by Bombardier.