Man Salutes the Statue of Liberty as he soars past in a Jetpack!

Man Salutes the Statue of Liberty as he soars past in a Jetpack!

Is it a bird, or is it a plane, or perhaps a man wearing a jetpack that flew off over the Hudson River in New York City on Tuesday November 3rd, circling around the Statue of Liberty before landing securely on a nearby boat. 
 
David Mayman, an Australian business visionary who has invested the past 10 years of his life designing and building prototype of the wearable flying gadget. With help from Nelson Tyler, his, a Hollywood-based inventor best known for creating helicopter camera systems and other movie ready innovations, of which 3 have earned him Academy Awards. 
 
Mayman and Nelson's Jetpack, named the JB-9, is sufficiently little to fit in the trunk of a car, however it's sufficiently capable to rocket its wearer 10,000 feet (3,050 meters) above the ground and fly at speeds of 63 mph (102 km/h). A pilot strapped to the jetpack can fly for up to 10 minutes before needing a tank top up. Hence Mayman had a lot of time to draw off a couple cool moves amid the JB-9's first-ever open flight.
 
"There were a few different flight manoeuvres that I tested [during the flight] — abrupt stops and turns," Mayman told Live Science. "Also, I saluted the Statue of Liberty." 
 
Overall, the jetpack performed very well during its inaugural flight, Mayman said, noting that the machine provided "awesome thrust, good speed, great acceleration and great stability."
 
The JB-9 pack works fine and dandy, however Mayman and Nelson (alongside the other colleagues at their organization, Jetpack Aviation) have effectively added to another model of the jetpack, the JB-10. The new flying machine will work just like the JB-9, yet it will probably be a considerable amount faster, sending its pilot soaring through the sky at speeds of up to 100 mph (160 km/h). This increase in speed will be coupled with added safety features, said Mayman.
 
Jetpack Aviation is working on automated safety features that could deploy balloons or parachutes should the pilot lose control in flight and begin to fall. At this time, the main pilot who benefits from these safety features is Mayman himself as he is the only one that knows how to fly the Jetpack.
Be that as it may, that may soon change, Jetpack Aviation is building up a pilot test program that will show new pilots how to fly the JB-9.
 
Still, it's not yet clear who these new pilots will be, yet Mayman guessed that the general population destined to profit by having a jetpack are the individuals who "need speed." The gadget's little size (above described to fit in the back of a car) makes it suitable to use wherever. For example, the military may want to use jetpacks to deploy troops into remote areas, said Mayman. And more than one person in Hollywood has already noted that this futuristic technology could be a star on the silver screen, he added.
 
Of course, the average person won't be able to purchase one of these Jetpacks really soon. (Though, another jetpack manufacturer has recently announced that their Jetpacks will be available to the public early next year) But one day, the company might design an automated, self-stabilizing pack that doesn't require any special training to use, said Mayman. At the point when that day comes, we hope to see more than one high-flying jet packer saluting the Statue of Liberty.